Blueberries and apples tied to lower Diabetes Risk

Filed in Gather Health Essential by on March 18, 2012 0 Comments
After reading the article below – my first thought was: Yum-Yum-Yum blueberry-Apple Pie. Then I said to myself said I – pie was not very good for diabetic me. Between the crust and sugar I knew there had to be a sweet alternative and I found it:
 
Microwave Blueberry filled baked apple.
The recipe below is for a single serving.
Do you think whip cream is allowed?
 
Me, I think it is a must – or scoop of vanilla ice cream.
 
 
 
Blueberries and apples tied to lower diabetes risk
 
- Yahoo! News
 
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) -
 
Eating more blueberries, apples and pears may be linked to lower risk of diabetes, according to a new U.S. study.
 
These fruits are loaded with flavonoids, a natural compound present in certain fruits, vegetables and grains, which some research has tentatively tied to heath benefits such as a lower risk of heart disease or cancer.
 
“People who ate a higher amount of blueberries or apples, they tended to have a low risk of type 2 diabetes,” said An Pan, a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health who worked on the study.
 
The findings show an association, he added, but don’t prove the fruits, themselves, prevent diabetes.
 
The new work, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, parallels a study published in the same journal last year associating flavonoid-rich fruits with a reduced risk of high blood pressure.
 
According to the American Diabetes Association, approximately 26 million Americans have the disease. It’s caused by a defect in the body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that converts glucose in the blood into energy.
 
Type 2 diabetes can usually be controlled with exercise and diet changes and without insulin.
 
For the new U.S. National Institutes of Health-funded study, researchers tracked the dietary patterns of approximately 200,000 men and women for up to 24 years.
The participants, who were enrolled in three large ongoing studies of American health professionals, filled out regular questionnaires about how frequently they consumed certain foods and beverages of a standard portion size.
 
None had diabetes at the outset, but about 12,600 of the participants were diagnosed during the research period.
 
The lightest blueberry eaters in the study reported getting less than one serving (half a cup) of the fruit per month, while the biggest blueberry consumers had two or more servings per week.
 
Pan’s team found that blueberry-lovers had a 23 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those who ate no blueberries. People who ate five or more apples a week also had a 23 percent lower risk compared with those who didn’t eat apples.
 
The researchers suggested that certain flavonoids especially high in those fruits might be behind their possibly beneficial effect on diabetes risk.
 
“We found consistent results across the three (study groups) that apples and blueberries are beneficial for type 2 diabetes,” Pan told Reuters Health.
 
That was after taking into account other risk factors, such as body weight, cigarette smoking and a family history of diabetes.
 
These results jibe with an earlier Finnish report related to consumption of berries and apples and diabetes risk.
 
But these previous studies were much smaller in scope, Pan noted.
 
He and his colleagues reported no financial conflicts of interest.
 
While fruit sugar raises blood glucose levels rapidly, other substances in fruit such as fibers and pectin may have diabetes-related benefits, said Dr. Loren Greene, a professor of medicine at New York University who was not involved in the study.
 
“It argues very nicely for the consumption of whole fruits rather than fruit juices,” she told Reuters Health, citing recent evidence that fruit juices may increase the risk of diabetes.
 
 
 
SOURCE: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, online February 22, 2012.
 
 
 
 
Blueberry-Filled Baked Apple
Microwave Recipe
 
 
 
To cook more than one apple at a time, increase the cooking time by about 1 minute per extra apple.
 
 
And remember, microwaves vary so yours may take a little less or more time.
 
 
1 medium apple

2 tablespoons frozen unsweetened blueberries (not thawed)
 
1/16 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons agave nectar (or other sweetener like honey)
(Or mix two teaspoons of Splenda or regular sugar with about teaspoon of hotwater)
 
 
 
Wash an apple and remove most of the core, leaving about 1/4-inch at the bottom.
 
Remove a thin strip of peel from around the cavity.
 
Place the apple into a deep microwave-safe baking dish or bowl.
 
Sprinkle the inside with a little cinnamon and fill with frozen blueberries.
 
Drizzle the agave syrup over the filling and top of the apple.
 
Cover the dish with lid or plastic wrap.
 
Microwave until apple is tender, 3-5 minutes, testing with a fork after 3 minutes.
 
Allow to cool for 5 minutes before serving.
 
(Caution: Inside can be very hot, so do let them cool before eating.)

 

 
Nutrition Facts

Nutrition (per serving): 112 calories, 3 calories from fat, less than 1g total fat, 0mg cholesterol, 2.7mg sodium, 180.7mg potassium, 29.3g carbohydrates, 3.7g fiber, 23.1g sugar, less than 1g protein, 1.5 points.
 
Nutrition analysis is approximate and will vary depending on exact ingredients used.
 
The Points above are calculated using a formula similar to Weight Watchers Points.
 
 
 
 
Couple of other recipes
 
 
Apple-blueberry cobbler – MayoClinic.com
 
 
Apple Blueberry Crumble Bars Recipe by Farmgirl Fare
 
 
Apple Blueberry Fruit Salad Recipes  Yummly
 
 
 
 
Red, White & Blueberry Fruit Salad Recipe  All Salads  FamilyFun
 
 
 
Spinach Salad with Blueberries Gala Apples and Hazelnuts in Honey Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette  Melissa’s Produce
 
 
 
 
Related Links -
 
 
Free Diet Plans at SparkPeople
 
 
 
American Diabetes Association
 
 
 
Points System Diet  eHow.com
 
 
Diet Tips or How To Lose Weight with a Spreadsheet and a Web Site (by Jeremy Zawodny)
 
 
 
 

The original Weight Watchers plan involves weekly meetings where dieters form an in-person support network.

 

Each member checks her weight privately and then the meeting leader advises her how many points she has per day for the upcoming week.

 

For people that cannot make weekly meetings or prefer to stay anonymous, Weight Watchers Online is available.

 

In addition, Weight Watchers offers an online points program tailored for men.

 

 

Free Diabetes Meal Plan Lose Weight To Control Diabetes. Signup Is Free And Quick! www.EverydayHealth.com/DiabetesMeal
 
 
Diet-to-Go Home Delivery Super Fresh Delivered to Your Door Rated the Best Tasting Diet Program Diettogo.com
 
 
Free Diet Recipes Easy & Delicious Diet Recipes. Find Your Favorite Diet Meals for Free! TotalRecipeSearch.com
 
 
WeightWatchers.com Our plans are healthy, sustainable & fit all lifestyles. Learn more! www.WeightWatchers.com
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

About the Author ()

I was born in Wisconsin, raised in Michigan and now live in California. After I graduated from Troy High School (Detroit, MI suburb) in 1965, I went to Western Michigan University and got a BA in English and Linguistics and later a MA in Teaching of Read

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