Happy St. Patrick’s Day (Saturday Writing Essential)

Filed in Gather Writing Essential by on March 17, 2012 0 Comments

First, an apology. I didn’t respond to any of the comments on my last week’s column. If you’ve read any of my rants about my neighbors, you’ll understand when I say I spent most of this week in legal proceedings. I think things have settled down and I should be able to spend more time on line from here on out.

That said, on with this week’s topic.

There are so many stories about St. Patrick and I thought I’d list a few interesting facts about his life and the holiday.

St. Patrick’s Day does not celebrate his birth; it is, rather, the day of his death, 17 March 461.

St. Patrick wasn’t born in Ireland. He was born in Roman Britain; kidnapped by Irish raiders, c. AD 403; and carried off to Ireland as a slave.

St. Patrick never rid Ireland of snakes. Current empirical data shows that there were no snakes in Ireland during his lifetime.

Until the seventeenth century, the color blue, not green, was associated with St. Patrick.

The Guinness Book of World Records shows that, from 1999 to 2007, the shortest St. Patrick’s Day parade in the world was in Dripsey, County Cork. There were two pubs in the town and the parade ran just a bit over a hundred feet: from the door of one pub to the door of the second pub.

* * *

Okay, I’m historied out — your turn and I’ll even be nice and give you two options.

Write a historical fiction about any time/place you wish.
     – or -
Write something historical about St. Patrick, St. Patrick’s Day, or Ireland.

 

This Week’s Challenge:

Use prose or poetry to write either a historical article or a historical fiction story. If you choose to write a nonfiction history article, it must be about St. Patrick, St. Patrick’s Day, or Ireland. The historical fiction can be about any time/place you wish.

 

Ideas:

You frequently hear of “the wearing of the green” in connection with St. Patrick’s Day. One of the legends surrounding this is the Irish Rebellion of 1798. Write something explaining how those two go together.

It’s St. Patrick’s Day, 2312, and you’re writing about the Great Irish Riots of 2212. Where were they, what caused them, and what was the outcome?

One fiction writer (Betty Rhodes) put forth the thought that St. Patrick ridding Ireland of snakes had something to do with the Druids. Track that down and either prove or disprove her theory.

St. Patrick’s Day is not a public holiday in the U.S., but it is in other countries. I can understand Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, but I need you to write something explaining why Newfoundland, Labrador, and Montserrat would have this as a public holiday.

 

Watch Out For:

If you’re writing historical fiction, it can be about any time or place you want. If you’re writing nonfiction history, it must have something to do with St. Patrick, St. Patrick’s Day, or Ireland.

 

Recap:

You’re getting better with this challenge. First time was one response, second time was five, and this week we did a bit better. Still didn’t have 5,000 submissions, but we did have some new entries so you won’t see this same challenge for another year. Please keep in mind that these writers worked hard to give you some reading enjoyment. It would be very courteous for you to read each of the following submissions.

Saturday Writing Essential: A Chance Encounter  by Richard Thuss

Saturday Writing Essential ~ Picked up at a Party  by Allen H.

Melons and Bats in A Harvest Festival Romance : SATWE : Gender divisions  by William Dotani

Meeting Chicks/Meeting Guys ~ for Saturday Writing Essential  by JOHN BECK

Laura meets Gerry -Prequel to my novels  by karen vaughan

HONG AND STEPHEN [Spring Forward, Fall Back (Saturday Writing Essential)]  by Joann B.

Boy Meets Girl (Saturday Writing Essential)  by Len Maxwell

(Saturday Writing Essential) To The Park  by Michael Fishman

Kathryn Esplin wrote a very nice story, but chose not to submit it. But… she put it up as a comment on last week’s column so you can read her submission  here.

 

Weekly reminder: Don’t forget to recommend an article that you like (to learn why, read Ann Marcaida’s article Attract More Writers and Artists to Gather!). Also, try to place a comment on at least one article and say more than you liked the piece. Tell the author what worked and what needs work.

The Rules:

  • Put this challenge statement at the beginning or end of your submission so readers will know what you’re supposed to do.

Challenge: Use prose or poetry to write either a historical article or a historical fiction story. If you choose to write a nonfiction history article, it must be about St. Patrick, St. Patrick’s Day, or Ireland. The historical fiction can be about any time/place you wish.

  • There is a limit of three submissions from each member per day. If you’re extremely prolific, spread out your work and post only three submissions per day.
  • Post to Gather Writing Essential.
  • Tag your submission with SatWE.
  • Include (Saturday Writing Essential) as part of your title.
  • I ask that you make your submission(s) by next Friday afternoon.

Good Writing!

About the Author ()

Leave a Reply