Weed Control Without Toxic Chemicals

Filed in Gather Life & Style Essential by on June 5, 2010 0 Comments

Looking for effective Weed Control, but don’t want a bunch of toxic chemicals on your lawn? Go the natural route. It is just as effective as Roundup and the other chemical laden products, yet cheap and easy to use.

I have been a gardener for more years than I like to admit. These recipes were handed down to me from various hillbillies and family members. Take my word, they work!

These recipes will kill any plants the solution is sprayed on, so take care when using around flower beds. If your weeds are in an area with a lot of desired vegetation, you can wipe the solution on with a rag.

Natural Weed Killer :

1 tablespoon of gin
1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon of liquid dish soap
1 quart of hot water

OR

1 gallon of distilled vinegar
1 cup of salt
1 tablespoon of liquid dish soap

Mix together and place into a spray bottle. Spray weeds and watch them die within 2 days.

Okay, we’ve killed the weeds, so we might as well take care of the little buggies that weant to munch on our veggies in the garden.This solution is safe for both flowers and vegetables.

Garlic pesticide spray

Soak 3 to 4 ounces of chopped garlic bulbs in 2 tablespoons of mineral oil for one day. Dissolve 1 tsp of fish emulsion( you can get it at a plant store) in a pint of water and add it to your solution. Stir. Strain liquid and store in a glass container – not metal! Dilute 1 part solution to every 20 parts of water. Kills aphids, mosquitoes, and onion flies.

Garlic pest control and insect repellent

1. If you plant garlic with tomatoes, it will keep away red spider mites.

2. If you plant garlic around fruit trees, it will repel borers.

3. Spray garlic pesticide on sweet potatoes to repel rabbits.

4. Spray ponds with garlic-based oil to kill mosquitoes.

An insect repellent spray made of tomato leaves

Add four or five pints of water and 1 tablespoon of cornstarch to tomato leaves crushed in your vegetable juicer. Strain it. Keep the unused spray refrigerated. Works good on roses too.

About the Author ()

I am a Geriatric Nurse with over 30 years experience. I am a technical widow, but engaged to the man of my dreams, and it only took me 43 years to find him. I enjoy natural settings, camping, hiking and playing in the woods. I take great pride in

Leave a Reply